Gathering water everyday- 19th-Century Women


We had a huge storm here 6 days ago. Many are still without power. If you live in the country, as we do, the water pump simply does not operate without electricity. Finding bottled water is the only solution. The situation helps me better understand the time-consuming chores of the past needed just to live everyday.

Diogène Ulysse Napoléon Maillart (French painter, 1840–1926), Young Italian Water Carrier

Eugene de Blaas, also known as Eugene von Blaas or Eugenio de Blaas (1843–1932)

James Barnes (English artist, 18??-1923)

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French Academic painter, 1825-1905)

Elisabeth Keyser (Swedish artist, 1851-1898)

Léon Augustin Lhermitte (French painter, 1844–1925) Retour de la Fountaine

Eugene de Blaas, also known as Eugene von Blaas or Eugenio de Blaas (1843–1932)

Theodore Robinson (American artist, 1852-1896)

Daniel Ridgway Knight (American expatriate genre artist, 1839-1924)

Juan Antonio Gonzalez (Spanish painter, 1842-1914)

Henry Mosler (American painter, 1841-1920)

Ignacio Diaz Olano (Spanish artist, 1860-1937)

Léon Augustin Lhermitte (French painter, 1844–1925) At the Fountain 1895

Margaret ‎(House of Habsburg) of Austria 1584–1611 Queen consort of Spain & Portugal

Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611)
Margaret of Austria (1584–1611), of the Habsburg family, became Queen consort of Spain & Portugal by her marriage to King Philip III, of the Habsburg family. Margaret was the daughter of Archduke Charles II of Austria, the son of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I & Maria Anna of Bavaria.

Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)
When she was 14, Margaret married Philip III of Spain (1576-1621), her 1st cousin, once-removed, in 1599, & became a very influential figure at her husband’s court.

Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)
Although it was one of those strategically arranged marriages between the Austrian & Spanish Habsburgs, Philip had an "affectionate, close relationship" with Margaret, & paid her even more attention after she bore him a son in 1605.

1603-09 Margaret of Austria by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) 1603-1609
At the Spanish court, the Austrian Margaret was a patroness of the arts, a pious Catholic, "astute & very skillful" in her political dealings.

1607 Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)
The pro-Austrian camp at the Spanish court was opposed by the Duke of Lerma, the King’s chief minister, who argued that Spain should pursue her own course of action independently of religious (Catholic) or dynastic (Habsburg Family) ties.

1609 Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Portrait of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611)
Queen Margaret was "melancholic" & unhappy about the influence of Duke, whom she considered corrupt, over her husband, & continually fought him for influence over the king.

Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez
The Duke of Lerma was eventually removed from power in 1618, but Margaret was already dead.

Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608) Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) with her daughter Infanta Maria Anna who lived from Feb 1-Feb 2, 1603
Margaret & Philip were the parents of 8 children, of whom 5 survived into adulthood. At age 26, Margaret died while giving birth to her child, Alfonso. Her husband never remarried & died 10 years later.

Portrait of Andres Lopez King Philip III of Spain (1576-1621)

Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Portrait of the children of Philip III of Spain (Ferdinand, Alfonso and Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) 1612

Detail Child of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Alfonso Mauricio who lived 1611-12.

Detail Child of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627). Margarethe who lived 1610-17

Santiago Morán el Viejo (1571-1626) Child of Margarethe of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) Margarethe lived 1610-17.

Anna of Austria 1549-80 marries her uncle Philip II of Spain 1527-98 & has 5 children

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Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), 1571 by Alonso Sanchez Coello (Spanish Painter, c 1531-1588) Detail
Anna of Austria (1549–1580), was Queen consort of Spain & Portugal. She was the first daughter of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor & Maria of Spain. She was born in Spain, but lived in Vienna from the age of four.

Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II. of Austria and his wife Maria (1528-1603) of Spain with Anna (1549-1580), Rudolph (1552-1612 and Ernst (1553-1595)
Anna was considered the favorite child of her father. It is said that once a meeting of the State of Hungary was postponed because Anna was sick. Anna received a Catholic education, even though her father was sympathetic to Lutheranism.

Archduchess Anna, Daughter of Emperor Maximillian II, attr to Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1527-1593)
As the eldest daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor, Anna was a desirable party for marriage at the European courts. Her parents preferred to arrange a Spanish marriage for her because of its links between the Austrian & Spanish Habsburg families.

King Philip II of Spain by Sofonisba Anguissola (Italian artist, 1530s-1625) Paolo Fagolo in 1563 said about Philip II of Spain that he was "slight of stature and round-faced, with pale blue eyes, somewhat prominent lip, and pink skin, but his overall appearance is very attractive." The Ambassador went on to say "He dresses very tastefully, and everything that he does is courteous and gracious."
Marriage apparently was a Habsurg strategy to accumulate territory & sovereignty by tracking down appropriate foreign royals to marry. If no appropriate royal was available, then they kept things in the family by marrying cousins or by uncles marrying one of their nieces. In October 1568, Anna’s uncle King Phillip II of Spain’s 3rd wife, Isabel, died. Reportedly Anna’s mother María was glad to read a letter from her own brother some months later asking for his niece’s hand. She would become his 4th wife. In 1569, Anna’s engagement to her uncle Philip II was announced. In 1570, they married by proxy. He was 43, & she was 21.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98)
It is reported, that when Anna learned that she was going to marry her admired uncle, she couldn’t be more pleased. She went to Spain with her brothers Wenceslass & Albert, who were to receive a Spanish education. When she crossed the border, she was joined by her brothers Rudolph & Ernest, who had already been living in Spain. Ana & Phillip married in Segovia in November of 1570.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), by Bartolome Gonzalez y Serrano (1564-1627)
Just as she was her father’s favorite child, she was also Philip’s most adored wife. But the marriage between the king & his neice was at first opposed by many, including Pope Pius V. According to diplomats, the determined king was in love with his young bride. It was Philip’s 4th marriage, but the king still had no male heir.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98)
Anna apparently completed her duties flawlessly. Not only was she a good stepmother to Philip’s daughters Isabella Clara Eugenia and Catalina Micaela’, she also gave birth to 5 children, 4 boys & a girl. Their son Philip III of Spain (1578–1621), succeeded his father. He was their only child to live to adulthood.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), by Anthonis Mor (1519–1575)
There are no records of the king having mistresses during the time of this marriage. Queen Anna was cheerful & calm and managed to ease some of the stiff atmosphere at the Spanish court. Anna busied herself mostly with child-bearing, child-rearing, & needlework.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), by Sofonisba Anguissola (Italian artist, 1530s-1625)
When the couple travelled to Portugal, after the death of Henry of Portugal, they both became seriously ill. The king became ill first, and Anna prayed for his recovery. At the time, Anna was pregnant. She became more ill. In much pain after a premature childbirth, she died at the age of about 30. Her uncle & husband King Phillip II was devastated.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)
This marriage was the 1st of 3 uncle-niece marriages in the pedigree of the great grandson of Philip II, Charles II of Spain. Over time, the problems caused by Habsburg inbreeding got worse. Charles’s genetically caused diseases would end the Habsburg line in Spain. In 1700, the last Spanish Habsburg king died. Most folks have 4 grandparents, 8 great grandparents, 16 great great grandparents. Charles II of Spain had just 9 total. He died without issue at age 35.

Anne of Austria, Queen of Spain (1549-80), Wife of Philip II of Spain (1527-98), 1571 by Alonso Sanchez Coello (Spanish Painter, c 1531-1588)

3 responses

  1. Pingback: Meninas Velazquez: Margaret of Austria, the Spanish Menina | Yareah Magazine. Arts and writing

  2. Another astounding collection! 🙂

    2012/08/19 at 4:14 pm

    • Vielen Dank Sue…..

      2012/08/20 at 1:00 am